Chemistry 105: General Chemistry I Syllabus Spring 2007

Lectures: 10:20-11:20 MWF (HS-107) Attendance strongly recommended (response clicker answers count for extra credit).

Labs: Attendance required (two unexcused absences = automatic F for course). All labs meet in HS-404 at various times (See LABORATORY SECTION below).

Discussions: Attendance strongly recommended (in class quizzes and activities count for grade). All discussions meet in HS-310 on Wednesday at various times (See DISCUSSION SECTION below).

Instructors:

Name

Office

Phone

e-mail

Dr. J. Gutow*

HS-412

424-1326

gutow@uwosh.edu

Dr. C. Gibsonπ

HS-432

424-1400

gibson@uwosh.edu

Dr. S. Neuendorf

HS-415

424-7101

neuendor@uwosh.edu

Mrs. C. Willihnganz§

HS-447

424-7093

willihnc@uwosh.edu

*All administrative questions, scheduling, exam regrades, etc. should be directed to Dr. Gutow. πDiscussion only. Lab and Workshop. §Lab only.

Required Materials

Text: General Chemistry: The Essential Concepts, 4ed, by R. Chang. Try to look at each section before we begin discussing it in class. This will familiarize you with the vocabulary and concepts being discussed so that you can take notes more efficiently. This text was chosen because it has good explanations of how to solve problems, explains concepts clearly and succinctly, and is written so that topics do not need to be covered in the order they appear.

Lab Manual: Cooperative Chemistry, 3rd Ed. by Cooper.

Laboratory Notebook: Must be bound and make copies of each page. The preferred carbonless notebook is sold at the University Bookstore bundled with the Lab Manual.

Safety goggles with covered vents, available at the Bookstore or from the Chemistry Club ($4 outside lab the first day).

Calculator capable of handling scientific notation, square roots, powers and logs.

eInstruction response clicker: Class code and a registration coupon will be provided the first day of class.

Subscription to e-mail discussion list: All students are required to sign up for the class e-mail discussion list by Wednesday, February 7, 2007 to pass the course. Instructions for subscribing in RESOURCES SECTION.

Optional Materials: Problem Solving Workbook with Solutions for use with General Chemistry by Chang, Understanding Chemistry by Lovett&Chang and Schaum's Outline of College Chemistry may be ordered through bookstores. None of these are likely to be necessary. Solution manuals are generally full of errors. The text itself contains study summaries, example solved problems and practice problems. Answers to most end-of-chapter problems are in the back of the book. Worked out answers to suggested homework that do not have answers in the back will be provided on the class web site.

Course Prerequisite: Credit in or concurrent with Math 104, College Algebra

Course Objectives/Overview: 105 is the first chemistry course for science majors. It also meets the requirements for pre-chiropracty/dental/medical/pharmacy/physical therapy/veterinary students. It is primarily an introduction to the structure and composition of matter. We will also begin to discuss the ways that reactions can change matter. Chemical reactions are the main topic of 106.

As part of a good liberal arts curriculum this course has a number of goals. The primary goal, as described above, is to introduce you to structure and composition of matter. This topic fits well into the liberal arts curriculum because it teaches skills which are generally useful and specific models that are widely applicable. Learning to use these models is extremely good practice at solving unfamiliar problems as well as thinking analytically, critically and creatively. A few of the things these models are used for are understanding the chemical reactions involved in living, the shapes of biomolecules, environmental issues such as global warming, developing new drugs, and designing solid-state electronics. A secondary, but very important goal of the course, is to help you develop effective communication skills. You will work on written communication skills primarily in lab where you will produce reports on your work.

Each week you will have at least four places to learn chemistry. At home or in the library you will read the textbook, study the vocabulary, and do problems to test your understanding. In lecture you will listen to descriptions of the most important and/or confusing concepts,take notes and try some exercises. In discussion you will use data or models and calculations to build theories and practice techniques. In the laboratory you will do experiments to discover properties of matter. You are encouraged to visit the instructors during office hours to clear up points of confusion. An optional weekly workshop organized by Dr. Sandra Neuendorf provides practice problems to do with a group, assisted by advanced chemistry students (see RESOURCES SECTION).

Lecture: Lectures are Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Each 60 minute period will be devoted to several concepts, with the material corresponding to the textbook sections listed in the schedule below. Bring your calculator and clicker so that you will be able to do practice problems. You can earn up to 35 points extra credit by answering the clicker questions correctly (there will be more than 35 clicker questions at 1 point each).

Exams: There will be five 60 minute exams administered in class. Although the exams are not cumulative you will need to know material from the earlier chapters to understand things covered on the later exams.

Discussion: Discussion is a chance for you to work on chemistry in small groups and with more direct interaction with the instructor. Most discussions will consist of small group exercises directed by worksheets (8 points for doing each worksheet) designed to demonstrate properties of matter or help you learn necessary skills. For example you might analyze periodic trends in melting points. The lowest worksheet score will be dropped. A quiz (25 points each) based on the homework will also be given at the beginning of most discussions. The lowest quiz score will be dropped.

There are five discussion sections meeting on Wednesdays in (sections 1- 4 meet in HS-310, 5 meets in HS-309) each is associated with a lab section of the same number:

1) 1:50 - 2:50

2) 1:50 - 2:50

3) 3:00 - 4:00

4) 3:00 - 4:00

5) 4:10 - 5:10


Reading/Studying: Research into how successful students study shows that devotion of time each day to chemistry homework is the most efficient way to study for the class. College students are very busy; try this method to save time!

Reading assignments will be included on the homework sheet distributed on the class web site and through the e-mail discussion list for each section. Skim the text before the first lecture on the material. Look at the introduction, the subtitles for sections, the pictures and their captions, and the chapter highlights listed at the end.

After each lecture review your notes and read the appropriate textbook sections. Work through the in-text examples and exercises as you go along. If anything is confusing ask one of your instructors about it.

Go to the review section at the end of the chapter and see which topics, skills and equations are clear to you. Mark any that you have trouble with so you can ask more questions, study it more and do more examples of related problems.

Homework: Homework is not graded. Answer keys will be provided to allow you to study for the quizzes and exams. Answers to even end of chapter problems may be found in the appendices beginning on page AP-1, after the glossary. Answers to assigned problems without answers in the back of the text will be available a few days after the problems are assigned. Answer keys will be posted on the Chemistry 105 web site, accessible through links on Dr. Gutow’s home page (http://www.uwosh.edu/faculty_staff/gutow). You should do the homework in a timely manner since it will prepare you for the tests and quizzes.

Class Schedule

Week of

Lab*

Mon Lecture Topic

Wed Lecture Topic

Wednesday Discussion Topic

Quiz

Fri Lecture Topic

Jan 29

No Lab

Introduction

Origin of Matter

Diagnositic Worksheet/Significant Figures

no

Origin of Matter

Feb 5

Lab

Elements/ Radiochemistry

Elements/ Radiochemistry

Isotopes and Radiochemical Dating

yes

Elements/ Radiochemistry

Feb 12

Lab

Review

EXAM

Coulomb's Law/ Shell Model of Atoms

no

Atomic Structure

Feb 19

Lab

Atomic Structure

Atomic Structure

Periodicity/ Atomic Size

yes

Atomic Structure/ Simple Compounds

Feb 26

Lab

Simple Compounds

Simple Compounds/ RXNs & Stoichiometry

Percent Composition and Empirical Formulas

yes

Review

Mar 5

Lab

EXAM

RXNs & Stoichiometry

Limiting Reagents/Stoichiometry

no

RXNs & Stoichiometry/ Solutions I

Mar 12

Lab

Solutions I

Solutions I

Molarity and Solubility

yes

Bonding

Mar 19




SPRING BREAK



Mar 26

Lab

Bonding

Bonding

Bonding

yes

Review

Apr 2

Lab

EXAM

Greenhouse Gases & Molecular Shape

Greenhouse Gases

no

Greenhouse Gases & Molecular Shape

Apr 9

Lab

Greenhouse Gases & Molecular Shape

Greenhouse Gases & Molecular Shape

Molecular Geometry & Hybridization

yes

Gases

Apr 16

Lab

Gases

Gases

Gas Laws

yes

Review

Apr 23

Lab

EXAM

Solutions II

Intermolecular Interactions

no

Solutions II/Intermolecular Forces

April 30

Lab

Intermolecular Forces

Intermolecular Forces

Crystals/Gems

yes

Solids

May 7

Lab

Solids

Solids/Review

Analytical Reasoning Quiz

no

EXAM

*See Lab Schedule below for exact experiments and when assignments are due.


Laboratory: In the laboratory you will learn to design experiments, use scientific instruments, make careful observations, and communicate your results to other scientists.

Safety is crucial in the laboratory. The dress code for chemistry laboratory includes safety goggles, long pants, and closed shoes. Safety rules will be reviewed during the first lab.

This laboratory is probably different from most that you have taken. There will not be a new lab project each week. Most of the labs will be extended, open-ended projects. Before each new project begins, read the description of the project and consult the relevant sections of the lab manual (equipment, techniques, instruments, appendices). In the lab you will work with your group to plan an approach to answering the question or solving the problem. The instructor will be available for assistance. A written plan must be approved by your instructor before the group begins the experiment.

All procedures actually performed, observations and other data should be written in your laboratory notebook in ink. Refer to page 18, "The laboratory notebook" in the lab manual. List your lab partners, since their notebooks may contain data that your notes do not. Your notes must be complete before you leave each week. The notebooks may not leave the lab until the end of the semester; you may take the copies for your reference.

You will be writing some individual reports and some group reports. The reports will be graded on the basis of style, grammar and spelling as well as data analysis and interpretation. For most of the labs you will have a chance to review a draft with your group members and the instructor before turning in the report and will get points for producing such a draft.

Group reports will be constructed with a contribution from each group member. Each student will be assigned to write a section (Introduction, Experimental, Results, or Discussion/Conclusion) and the assignment will rotate during the semester. Each section will be graded individually. Your score will be determined using the following formula: (0.75 x points of your section) + (0.25 x average of the other sections). This means that you will receive up to 75% of the lab report points just by doing your section. In order to secure a higher score for lab reports, group members are encouraged to communicate and exchange feedback.

If one (or more) of the group members are not cooperating to compile a full report, group members should assist the person(s) who are having difficulties. If they are still unable to contribute their part, they may be excluded from the report compilation upon approval by your lab instructor. In this case, the group is still responsible for all four complete sections. People excluded from the group report must prepare FULL reports on their own.

No reports missing any sections will be graded. Assignments turned in a week or more late will get zero credit. Until that time late assignments will be marked down 10% per day.

Your lab grade will also depend on the quality of your laboratory notebook and lab work, your contribution to your group, and the research plan presented by your group.

You must receive at least 50% in lab to pass the course. Attendance in lab is mandatory. Two unexcused absences from lab will result in a failing grade for the course. To have an absence excused you must bring a written excuse to your instructor. There will be no make up labs, unless you can attend another laboratory section while the experiment is still in progress.


What is expected in an outstanding laboratory report?

Grammar: Complete sentences are to be written. The tense (present or past) and voice (active or passive voice) should be consistent. Because you will have completed the experiment most of the report should be in past tense and the passive voice (see page 20-35 of the lab manual).

Spelling: No or few errors are found.

References: Web sites, books, articles and handouts used in preparation of the report are listed at the end of the report as a numbered list. The numbers are used in the text to show where the information from the reference was used.

Organization: The information is divided into the four standard sections, labeled with their titles. Sections should be in the order listed below, not those in the lab manual.


Content of the Sections (They should appear in this order contrary to what the manual says)

Introduction: tells the reader why the report is worth reading. What may be learned from the experiment? What hypothesis is being tested? Does the experiment build on existing knowledge that has been presented in the text or lecture? If chemical reactions were performed, a balanced equation should be included. References to current work of others (published literature) can be in present tense as can statements of what is known. References to the work you did should be in past tense and passive voice.


Experimental: All reagents and equipment are described using correct terminology, including brand and model names for instruments. Names of chemicals are used rather than chemical formulas. Quantities of reagents and concentrations of solutions are given either here or in a table in the results section. The description of the procedures followed is complete enough that the experiment may be reproduced without consulting the lab manual or lab notebook. Standard methods (use of an analytical balance, preparation of a solution in a volumetric flask) are mentioned but not described. Diagrams are given for unusual apparatus. This section should be in past tense passive voice. Do not use command voice.


Results: All qualitative and quantitative observations are described. Both directly measured and calculated quantities are included. Tables and graphs are used to display data whenever possible. Titles or captions describe the contents of the table or graph. For any calculations, an algebraic equation and sample calculation including units are given. The rules for significant digits are followed. Within the text references to tables and figures that the reader is looking at may be in present tense. The rest of the description in this section should be in past tense passive voice.


Discussion: The significance of the experiment is discussed. What was learned? Did the results confirm or disprove the hypothesis? Can an alternative hypothesis be suggested from the data? Comparison should be made to results of previous experiments found in the chemical literature. Any known or suspected sources of error should be mentioned and their possible impact on the results described. Suggestions may be made for improvement of the procedures for the benefit of people who may decide to reproduce the experiment. Scientific reports do not include whether the scientists enjoyed doing an experiment. References to tables and figures that the reader is looking at may be in present tense. Except for suggested future experiments the rest of the discussion in this section should be in past tense passive voice.


Lab Schedule:

Week of

In Lab Activities*

Due in Lab**

(plans, report drafts, reports)

Jan 29

No Lab


Feb 5

Check-In/Safety/Density experiment

before lab read pp. 7-19, 45-54, 57-58, 68 (reading a meniscus), 95. As you write results and experimental refer to pp. 20-41.

Density plan made and approved.

Feb 12

Discussion of reports; Begin pigment synthesis lab.

Read handout from web site (print out, so you can fill out data sheets), pp. 70,74-75 (gravimetric analysis)

draft of Density experimental and results sections; prelab questions for pigment lab.

Feb 19

Complete pigment lab; discuss contents of introduction and conclusions; planning for next experiment.

Read pp. 38-41, 64-69, 87-90,129-133

Density lab report (experimental and results only); Analysis of Colas plan A

Feb 26

Analysis of Colas

Pigment Data Sheets plus introduction and conclusions; Analysis of Colas plan B.

Mar 5

colas continued

Analysis of Colas plan C

Mar 12

colas continued


Mar 19

Spring Break


Mar 26

Discussion of reports, planning for next experiment.

Read pp. 38-41, 53-54, 101-102

Draft cola report (each group member assigned a section); plan for Volume vs. Temperature of Gases.

Apr 2

Volume vs. Temperature of Gases

Cola report (group report)

Apr 9

Discussion of reports, planning for next experiment.

Read pp. 58-63, 67-69, 70, 74-75

Draft gas report (each group member assigned a section); Unknown Compound Plan A

Apr 16

Unknown Compound

Gas report (group report); Unknown Compound Plan B

Apr 23

Unknown Compound

Assignment of report sections.

April 30

Check-out of lab

Unknown Compound Report (group report)

May 7

No Lab/Late checkout


*Reading assignments refer to the Cooperative Chemistry Laboratory Manual. Reading assignments must be completed before lab.

**Notebooks must remain in the lab in the drawer assigned to your section. Take the duplicate pages with you so that you may complete write-ups.


The five laboratory sections each associated with the discussion of the same number are (all meet in HS-404):

Section # and When

Instructor

Section # and When

Instructor

1) 8:00 - 10:10 Mondays

Mrs. C. Willihnganz

4) 8:00 - 10:10 Thursdays

Dr. S. Neuendorf

2) 8:00 - 10:10 Tuesdays

Mrs. C. Willihnganz

5) 8:00 - 10:10 Fridays

Mrs. C. Willihnganz

3) 11:30 - 1:40 Tuesdays

Mrs. C. Willihnganz




Resources:

Chem 105 Web Site: Contains lots of useful information: copies of this syllabus, links to interesting and useful sites related to this course, interactive tutorials, information on tutors, homework assignments and answer keys. This site is constantly being revised so your suggestions of things to include would be appreciated. Most of the site is publicly accessible, however if you try to access homework information or answer keys you will be asked for a username and password. The username is "chem10507". The password will be provided the first day of class.


E-mail Discussion Group: You are required to subscribe to this to pass the course. This is an unmoderated discussion. You are encouraged to send in your answers to questions. The instructors will attempt to answer any questions that are not answered by your fellow students within 48 hours. To subscribe follow the link to the discussion list on the class web site. You should check your e-mail daily to get the maximum benefit from this discussion group. The instructor will also send announcements and reminders to this discussion group.


Optional Workshop: In workshop you will do practice problems in a group, assisted by advanced chemistry students. If you believe your math skills or chemistry background are weak you are strongly encouraged to attend this weekly workshop. This workshop meets 5:10-7:10 P on Tuesdays in HS-202 beginning the first week of classes. To enroll go to the first meeting of workshop. Dr. Neuendorf organizes these workshops.


Grading

Exams:

5 @ 200 points each

1000 (58.8 %)

Discussion Worksheets

12 @ 8 points each (1 dropped for absence)

96 (5.7 %)

Quizzes:

best 7 @ 25 points each

175 (10.3 %)

Analytical Reasoning Quiz

1 @ 79 points

79 (4.6%)

Laboratory:

Two or more unexcused absences from lab will result in a failing grade for the course.

Lab work and Notebook (8 @ 15 points = 120)

Plans (8 @ 6 points = 48)

Drafts (3 @ 11 =33)

Reports (1 @ 17 points & 4 @ 33 points = 149)

350 (20.6 %)*

Total:


1700 (100.0 %)

*You must receive at least 50% (175 points) in lab to pass the course.


The percentages necessary to receive a particular grade are listed below. The instructor reserves the right to adjust these downward.

A: >93%

AB: >89%

B: >83%

BC: >77%

C: >68%

CD: >59%

D: >50%

Course Policies:

Absences: The reason for any excused absences must be reported to your instructor (before the absence, if possible), and substantiated in writing by the appropriate person (i.e. doctor, parent, etc.). Assignments and tests missed because of an excused absence will not count against your record, but you will be held responsible for material covered during your absence. Please see your Student Handbook under "Class Attendance" for details of the University policy concerning excused absences.


Grading Errors: To be considered for possible regrading any mistakes must be brought to the attention of your instructor within one week of the time the exam, quiz or project is returned to you.


Final Grade Check: You are responsible for checking that your final score is correct. Save all papers, exams and quizzes until the final course grade has been determined.


A WORD TO THE WISE: The most common reason for a poor grade in this course is the failure to keep up with the work on a daily and weekly basis. In general, if you attend all parts of the course, read the text, complete and understand the problem assignments and lab experiments, you will pass the course. If you study in addition to that, you should do better. If you experience difficulty with any part of the course, seek help immediately. If you let it slide, it becomes more difficult to catch up because the subject matter tends to be cumulative.

Last Update: 1/29/07